Wednesday, September 9, 2015

Interview with Anselm Jappe - Brooklyn Rail

Extract ...

Rail (Alastair Hemmens): Let’s start by talking a bit about your intellectual development as a critical theorist. Could you say something about the historical and intellectual context in which your approach to critical theory first developed? Can you pinpoint any particular personal experiences that originally drove you towards the radical critique of capitalism?

Jappe: One of the strongest expressions of the vision of the world shared by many young people in the Seventies is Patti Smith singing “Outside of Society / That’s where I wanna be” (“Rock ’n’ Roll Nigger,” 1978). It is also one of the best summaries of the change that has occurred since then. Today, there’s lots of talk about “exclusion” from society, about “marginalization,” about the necessity of “including” all kinds of people in society. To be “outside of society” is now thought of as the worst thing that could possibly happen to you. This is not surprising, given that today the greatest threat that capitalist society poses to every one of us is that we are virtually superfluous and might easily become factually so. But in my adolescence, which took place in the latter half of the 1970s in the German city of Cologne, the echoes of the ’68 rebellion were still quite strong, even among very young people. And the very last thing that I and other unruly young people like myself wanted was to “integrate” ourselves into a society which seemed contemptible to us.

Read the rest of the interview at Brooklyn Rail.

Friday, July 31, 2015

Interview with Moishe Postone by Anej Korsika

Extract ...

Korsika: Professor Postone in your groundbreaking monograph Time, Labor and Social Domination you provide us with an in depth rereading of Marx’s critique of political economy. Could you reflect on the evolution of your thought. On the events and theoretical traditions at the University of Chicago and later on in Frankfurt, that motivated you to devote yourself to this seminal project?

Postone: When I was student at the University of Chicago, I was caught between two interests and intentions, theoretically. Although I regarded myself very much as a person of the Left, it seemed to me that Marxism had too much in common with positivism, on the one hand, and nineteenth century notions of progress, on the other. I was much more impressed at the time by conservative critiques of modernity. I thought they grasped problems of modernity more fully than did Marxism. That was in part because we had, at Chicago at the time, many émigré scholars who had fled Nazi Germany. They brought with them a whole range of intellectual discourses that criticized various forms of positivism from various directions, that I found very powerful.

For the full article click here to go to the original post on Korsika's blog.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

10 JULY 2015 - Never Work Conference – School of Modern Languages, Cardiff University – Tickets Now Available



The conference is open to all, TICKETS are now available via this website: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/never-work-conference-tickets-16580125602

“A corpse rules society – the corpse of labour.” – Manifesto Against Labour, Krisis-Group

Since the 1970s modern societies have been increasingly faced with social issues caused by a reliance on a form of life that technological development is making redundant: work. Competition drives companies to eject human beings from the labour process even while it relies on those people as consumers and producers of value. Equally, more human beings than ever before depend upon the capitalist production process for their survival, yet at this historical juncture it appears no longer to have need of them. It is this contradiction that some contemporary social critics have diagnosed as the basis of a crisis of civilisation through which we are currently living. The symptoms of this crisis are manifold and, one can argue, affect every aspect of society: privatisation, financialisation and economic crises, mass unemployment, the casualisation of labour and austerity programmes, regional conflict, the rise of political extremism, growing wealth inequality, individualisation, school shootings and the ever-growing number of people suffering from narcissistic personality disorders, to name but a few. Despite the sheer scale of problems that society currently faces, the dominant social discourse has rarely considered that a crisis of the very categories of capitalist society could be the source of the problem. Work, in particular, is central to modern notions of individual and collective identity, of morality and even of human nature. It is the means through which individuals are expected to realise themselves and to gain access to social wealth. It is perhaps for this reason that, while work is often seen as central to resolving the current crisis – either through calls for higher wages and the right to work or through attacks on immigrants and the unemployed – it is rarely seen as the problem in itself. The aim of this conference is therefore to ask what might a critique of work usefully offer us in addressing contemporary social issues and, if one will allow it, the possibility of a greater crisis of modern civilisation.

Sir Martin Evans Building, Cardiff University, Rooms C/-1.01 and C/-1.04

10 JULY 2015

08:30-09:00 Registration

09:00-10:00 Keynote Speaker: Anselm Jappe
Chair: Alastair Hemmens

10:00-11:00 Panels 1 and 2 (Running Parallel)

The Practice of Antiwork

Chair: Nick Parsons
Speaker 1: Jamie Woodcock: The practice of anti-work politics: what are the implications for organisation and strategy?
Speaker 2: Steve Fontaine: “Work”? Never!

Work on Film

Chair: Heiko Feldner
Speaker 1: Audrey Evrard: Is Our Work the Problem? Post-1990 French Documentary Filmmaking and the Status of Cultural/Creative Work
Speaker 2: Martin O’Shaughnessy: No exit: French and Belgian film and worker suicide

11:00-11:15 Coffee Break

11:15-12:45 Panels 3 and 4 (Running Parallel)

The Situationists and Work

Chair: Alastair Hemmens
Speaker 1: Gabriel Zacarias: Guy Debord’s critique of work, from Surrealism to Marxism
Speaker 2: Tom Bunyard: Subject-Object Unity and Workers' Councils in Guy Debord's Theory of 'Spectacle'
Speaker 3: David Black: Critique of the Situationist Dialectic

Politicising Work

Chair: David Frayne
Speaker 1: Nick Nesbitt: Spectres of the Infinitesimal: The Problem with Antiwork
Speaker 2: Mari Lindman: Work critique as immanent critique?
Speaker 3: Harry Pitts: Normalisation, exclusion, commensuration: work, economics and the critique of political economy

12:45-13:45 Lunch Break

13:45-14:45 Keynote Speaker: Norbert Trenkle
Chair: Josh Robinson

14:45-16:15 Panels 5 and 6 (Running Parallel)

The Historicity of Labour

Chair: Alastair Hemmens
Speaker 1: Claudio Cellis: The Work of Paying Attention: The Attention Economy and the Historicity of Labour
Speaker 2: Jason Dawsey: Liquidating the Human: Günther Anders and the Abolition of Work
Speaker 3: Cassio Boechat and Fabio Pitta: Use-values as part of fictitious social reproduction

Work and Critical Theory

Chair: Heiko Feldner
Speaker 1: Bart Zantvoort: Institutional Inertia and the Irrelevance of Work
Speaker 2: David Frayne: The Stronghold of Work
Speaker 3: Marcel Stoetzler: Labour and identity according to Adorno and Horkheimer

16:15-16:30 Coffee Break

16:30-18:00 Panel 7

The Critique of Value

Chair: Josh Robinson
Speaker 1: Elmar Flatschart: Value-theoretical differences between Wert-Abspaltungs-Kritik and Neue Marx Lektüre and their Consequences
Speaker 2: Konstantinous Stylianou: A Critique of Labour and Its Barriers: An Analysis on the Form of the Subject of Modernity
Speaker 3: Robin Halpin: Presentation of Robert Kurz’ “The Substance of Capital”


18:00+ Drinks Reception

The conference is open to all, TICKETS are now available via this website: http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/never-work-conference-tickets-16580125602

Friday, January 16, 2015

Never Work – Cardiff University Conference – Friday 10 July 2015 – Call for Papers


“A corpse rules society – the corpse of labour.” – Manifesto Against Labour, Krisis-Group

Since the 1970s modern societies have been increasingly faced with social issues caused by a reliance on a form of life that technological development is making redundant: work. Competition drives companies to eject human beings from the labour process even while it relies on those people as consumers and producers of value. Equally, more human beings than ever before depend upon the capitalist production process for their survival, yet at this historical juncture it appears no longer to have need of them. It is this contradiction that some contemporary social critics have diagnosed as the basis of a crisis of civilisation through which we are currently living. The symptoms of this crisis are manifold and, one can argue, affect every aspect of society: privatisation, financialisation and economic crises, mass unemployment, the casualisation of labour and austerity programmes, regional conflict, the rise of political extremism, growing wealth inequality, individualisation, school shootings and the ever-growing number of people suffering from narcissistic personality disorders, to name but a few. Despite the sheer scale of problems that society currently faces, the dominant social discourse has rarely considered that a crisis of the very categories of capitalist society could be the source of the problem. Work, in particular, is central to modern notions of individual and collective identity, of morality and even of human nature. It is the means through which individuals are expected to realise themselves and to gain access to social wealth. It is perhaps for this reason that, while work is often seen as central to resolving the current crisis – either through calls for higher wages and the right to work or through attacks on immigrants and the unemployed – it is rarely seen as the problem in itself. The aim of this conference is therefore to ask what might a critique of work usefully offer us in addressing contemporary social issues and, if one will allow it, the possibility of a greater crisis of modern civilisation.

Contributors might consider:
·      What kinds of critique of work are necessary, on the basis of what criteria and in the name of what alternatives?
·      What hampers such a critique and how can we remove, go around or through these barriers?
·      What critical theories can usefully contribute to a contemporary critique of work?
·      How can contemporary social movements benefit from a critique of work?
·      How might a theoretical critique of work manifest itself practically and how might critiques of work in practice inform theoretical critiques?
·      What lessons can we learn from historical and contemporary social movements against work?
·      What might a critique of work tell us about the political, economic and psychological forms and changes that society is currently experiencing?
·      What are particularly unexamined aspects of the critique of work that need addressing?
·      How widespread and persistent are critiques of work in contemporary social movements and what kinds of critique of work have they developed?
·      What useful relationship might the critique of work have with critiques of the state, patriarchy, politics and other social forms?
·      What alternatives to work still exist, have existed and might exist?

Confirmed keynote speakers will be: Anselm Jappe (author of Guy Debord, Les Aventures de la marchandise, Crédit à mort) and Norbert Trenkle (author of Die Große Entwertung, Dead Men Working). Both of our keynotes are members of the wertkritik, or “critique of value”, school of Marxian critique.

Abstracts of 350 words, with a small bio, should be sent to Dr Alastair Hemmens (hemmensa@cardiff.ac.uk) by 20 February 2015. The conference itself will take place at Cardiff University, Wales, on 10 July 2015.

This research is funded by the Leverhulme Trust Early Career Fellowship: Dr Alastair Hemmens, “‘Ne travaillez jamais’: The Critique of Work in Nineteenth- and Twentieth-Century French Thought, from Charles Fourier to Guy Debord.”



Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Kurz, A Journey Into Capitalism's Heart of Darkness - Anselm Jappe

Abstract from the article translated by myself and John McHale that was recently published in the journal Historical Materialism:

The late Robert Kurz was one of the principal theorists of ‘the critique of value’ in Germany. This paper uses the recent release of a collection of his essays in French and his posthumously published Geld ohne Wert [Money without Value] (2012) as a starting point for a discussion of the critical project that Kurz undertook over a period of 25 years. Kurz was exemplary in returning to the most radical insights of Marx, even when these went against some of the other ideas of the master. He was an ardent proponent of a crisis theory of capitalism: that the categories of the capitalist mode of production have reached their ‘historical limit’ as society no longer produces enough value. On this basis Kurz argued that none of the proposals for dealing with this crisis within the framework of capitalism are feasible. Kurz demonstrated that the basic categories of the capitalist mode of production, such as money, are not universal but that they developed at the same time, towards the end of the Middle Ages, with the invention of firearms and the states' need for money that this fuelled. In Geld ohne Wert, Kurz asserts that money in pre-capitalist societies was not a bearer of value but a representation of social ties. He wonders whether, with the current crisis, we are seeing a return to a form of money without value, but now within the framework of a social sacrifice to the fetishistic form of mediation. The paper concludes by suggesting that Kurz has not yet reached a wider public outside Germany because for many his ideas still prove too radical to face.
 Link.

Monday, August 25, 2014

Interview with Paul Braun on La Grande dévalorisation

An interview with Paul Braun, one of the translators of La Grande dévalorisation (see earlier blog post), outlining the contents of this important publication.

Click here to download the interview.

Crise financière, crise du néoliberéralisme, ou crise du capitalisme? - Anselm Jappe

The Adventures of the Subject Seminar Series - Anselm Jappe

Recordings of Anselm Jappe's recent seminar series at the EHESS in Paris are now online. The lectures examine and critique the category of the subject in capitalist society and will be the foundation of a future book to accompany his earlier Les Aventures de la marchandise.

Click here for a summary of what recordings are available.

And click here for the recordings themselves.

Crisi finanziaria, crisi economica, o crisi del capitalismo? - Anselm Jappe


L'Horizon des possibles - Anselm Jappe


Thursday, July 17, 2014

Moishe Postone - "Notes on History, Antisemitism, and the Holocaust"


A fascinating and recently-uploaded lecture on Anti-Semitism and history by Moishe Postone.

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

La Grande Dévalorisation - Lohoff and Trenkle

Recently translated into French from German, this important text by Lohoff and Trenkle is a must read. As the sub-heading suggests, it puts forth a detailed explanation of why the current crisis cannot be blamed on the financial bets of greedy bankers, nor on any other scapegoat figure the left and the right choose to put in their sights. Through a detailed analysis based on the critique of value developed in Germany by the Krisis group, of which the authors are important members, this lengthy tome will provide an important radical perspective on the true source of humanity's current problems: the capitalist mode of production itself. The conclusion is that we are currently living through the slow collapse of the valorisation process and the only way to save ourselves from its destructive logic is to break with the categories of capitalist society once and for all. An informative read that gets into the important details of our current moment.

Sunday, May 4, 2014

Marxism and the Critique of Value - Mediations Journal

An important new collection of translations of German-language critique of value material has just been published by the journal Mediations. Edited by Neil Larsen, Mathias Nilges, Josh Robinson and Nicholas Brown, the book is available both in printed form and online for free as a pdf. The volume brings together essays by Robert Kurz, Roswitha Scholz, Nobert Trenkle, Ernst Lohoff, Karl-Heinz Lewed, Claus Peter Ortlieb.

Click here to download the complete file.

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

Towards a History of the Critique of Value - Anselm Jappe

I recently helped to translate an introduction to the history of the critique of value written by Anselm Jappe. The full article, published this month in Capitalism, Nature, Socialism, can be read online here.

An extract:

In 1991, the Berlin Wall fell and the Soviet Union was about to breathe its last. The euphoria of victory was spreading among those who had always, or for some time at least, been convinced that free markets and Western democracy were the last word in history. For the radical left, including those who never had any illusions about “actually existing socialism,” there was much consternation: Was capitalism really impossible to overcome? Was it necessary to limit themselves from now on to making the occasional modest reform? In this context, the appearance of a German-language book entitled The Collapse of Modernization: From the Fall of Barracks Socialism to World Economic Crisis (Kurz 1991) could not but seem bizarre. Nonetheless, this book, published by a major publishing house, made a substantial impact in a then recently “reunited” Germany. Up to this point the book's author, Robert Kurz (1943–2012), was only known in restricted Marxist circles for running a rather obscure journal that had recently changed its name from Marxistische Kritik (Marxist Critique) to Krisis (Crisis).
 
Kurz claimed in his book that, far from signalling the final triumph of Western capitalism, the fall of Eastern European countries was only a stage in the gradual collapse of a world economy based on the commodity, value, abstract labour and money. After two centuries, the capitalist mode of production had reached its historical limits: the rationalisation of production, which involves the replacement of human labour by technology, undermines the basis of the production of value, and therefore of surplus-value, which is the sole objective of producing commodities. However, nothing but living labour, the labour required in the act of its execution, creates value and surplus-value. The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) had been nothing but a variation of world market society. It was a form of “catch-up modernisation,” that is to say, the violent introduction of the basic mechanisms of value production in a backward country that would not otherwise have been able to become an autonomous part of the world market. If the USSR was not “socialist,” this was not only due to the dictatorship of a bureaucratic class, as the anti-Stalinist left claimed. The real reason was that the central categories of capitalism—the commodity, value, labour, money—had never been abolished. All that had ever been claimed was that these were better “managed” for the “benefit of the workers.” What had collapsed was not an “alternative” to the capitalist system, but rather the “weakest link” in this system. However, the mechanism of which the “socialist” countries had been victims was also about to bring the “winners” into crisis. Western capitalism was destined very soon to enter into a stage of great turmoil that would lead to the final collapse of society based on commodity fetishism. What mechanism was it? It was the impossibility of containing the growth of productive forces—notably the enormous productivity gains derived from microelectronics since the 1970s—in the straightjacket of commodity value production. Value, as a social form, does not recognise the actual usefulness of commodities. It only considers the quantity of “abstract labour” that they contain, that is, the quantity of pure expenditure of human energy measured in time.

Wednesday, January 8, 2014

Attention Danger Travail - Pierre Carles (2003)


Check out this fascinating documentary by Pierre Carles from 2003 about French people who refuse to look for work. A bas le travail!

Monday, December 2, 2013

Le Vampire du Borinage: Raoul Vaneigem, Hiver '60, and the hennuyer Working Class

I have recently published an article on the relationship between Raoul Vaneigem and the Belgian general strike of the winter of 1960-1961. Click here to find out more of the details.

Abstract:

This article considers the work of Raoul Vaneigem (b.1934), a member of the Situationist International and author of Traité de savoir-vivre à l'usage des jeunes générations (1967), in the context of the social history of Hainaut, Belgium. The first section situates Vaneigem in his working-class background in Hainaut. The second part focuses on the events of the Belgian general strike of winter 1960-61, also known as ‘Hiver '60’. Guy Debord first made direct contact with Raoul Vaneigem during this general strike and Vaneigem joined the Situationist International almost immediately after. The article will reflect on the spontaneous, anti-leftist, nature of the strike and how this, along with many of its other themes, later found expression in the Situationist writing of Raoul Vaneigem and his contribution to the organisation. The overall aim of the article is to suggest that the Situationist response to contemporary social movements in Belgium in part shaped the nature of their influence during May '68 in France.

Cet article examine l'œuvre de Raoul Vaneigem (né en 1934), un membre de l'Internationale situationniste et l'auteur de Traité de savoir-vivre à l'usage des jeunes générations (1967), dans le contexte de l'histoire sociale de la région du Hainaut en Belgique. La première partie est consacrée à l'expérience de la vie ouvrière de Vaneigem dans le Hainaut. La deuxième partie se focalise sur les évènements des grandes grèves belges de l'hiver 1960 à 1961, aussi connues sous le nom d'Hiver ‘60’. Guy Debord contacta Raoul Vaneigem pour la première fois durant cette grève et Vaneigem s'inscrivit à l'Internationale situationniste presque immédiatement à la fin de celle-ci. L'article aborde la qualité spontanée, anti-gauchiste, de la grève et comment ce thème, avec plusieurs d'autres, s'est trouvé plus tard exprimé dans l'œuvre situationniste de Raoul Vaneigem et sa contribution à l'organisation. L'objectif général de l'article est d'avancer la thèse selon laquelle la réponse situationniste aux mouvements sociaux contemporains a en partie façonné la nature de leur influence pendant Mai '68 en France.

Friday, October 11, 2013

“Observations on The Communist Manifesto” by Raoul Vaneigem

Translated by Alastair Hemmens

1

The Communist Manifesto is an instructive example of the way in which a project of human realisation gives birth to an even more inhuman social system than the one that it claimed to destroy and sought to replace.

2

That which separates each individual through abstraction from his own concrete existence works to oppress him sooner or later. The Communist Manifesto contained in embryonic form the empire of bewildering lies and communist ideology that constituted state truth because the spirit of emancipation that inspires it acted as a separated form of the will to live, which at every moment is both affirmed and denied in everyday life.

3

The history of all hitherto existing society has only been the history of an economic and social system where man denies his inherent humanity by becoming the product of the commodity he produces. Unlike a single freedom that authenticates the refined realisation of desires, abstract freedoms have always been the result of a commodity expansion determined by the need to make a profit.

4

Over the course of its evolution, every time that the economy found itself a prisoner to archaic forms, it has destroyed them in the name of free commerce, only to immediately implement new tyrannies decreed by the law of profit. Whatever the economy invests in social benefits, it gets back at the price of a double crime against humanity: it oppresses in the name of the freedom of the nation, of the people or of the individual, and it turns into a death drive the passionate impulse in favour of life that the breakdown of former tyranny had rekindled.

5

It is creation, not labour, that is specific to human beings. The transformation of life force into labour force represses and inverts this aspiration for self-enjoyment that demands the combined creation of the world and individual destiny. A universe transformed by labour only achieves the modernity of its fundamental inhumanity because it implies the transformation of man into labourer, his negation as a living and desiring being. By basing emancipation on the collective management of the means of production, Marx and Engels turned liberty into the flag of universal oppression.

6

The opposition between bourgeoisie and proletariat obscured the separation introduced by labour into the individual body: the head, where the consciousness of desires is centred, erecting itself as the citadel of a Mind given over to the repression of libidinal matter and its laborious exploitation.

7

The idea that a party could constitute the “spearhead of the proletariat” reproduced in the proletariat the hierarchy that the denaturalising function of labour had established into the thinking brain – the “boss” – and the rest of the body. It was to reinforce a will to power already favoured by the competitive character of an economy that, far from overcoming the adaptive and predatory character of the animal kingdom, socialised it, thereby trammelling human evolution and repressing creation to the borders of its empire, into the margins of art and dream.

8

Economic, political and social history has proven Marxist theory right on two essential points: the withering away of the state and the tendency of the rate of profit to fall.
a) Having swallowed private capital in the East as in the West, the state regurgitated it in a more dilapidated condition, to which it can no longer find a solution.
b) The exploitation of human nature and terrestrial nature spread to such a degree that in exhausting the earth’s resources it exhausts its profitability. The tendency of the rate of profit to fall ultimately results today in closed-circuit financial speculation. The latter, invested less and less in production, clings to the residual profitability of the tertiary sector – dominated by unscrupulously profit-driven bureaucracy –, at the expense of the primary sector (agriculture, education, textiles, metallurgy etc.), the ruin of which demands the intervention of an ecological neo-capitalism.

9

Over the past two centuries, History has perpetually accelerated. 1789 marked the end of the predominance of an agricultural economy. The establishing of free trade propagated the democratic spirit, while the rise of industry strengthened the authoritarian spirit, inherent to the organisation of production, that state centralisation, fascist and Bolshevik in form, would bring to a peak.
            In the second half of the 20th century, the importance of the productive sector dropped in favour of the consumer sector, which offered the best guarantee of profitability. Decolonisation enters so much more easily into the process of economic transformation since the new imperative “It doesn’t matter what you buy, just buy!” oversees a new mode of colonisation of the masses in industrialised countries.
            The quantitative inflation of the consumable brings about a fall in the quality of goods, the deterioration of use-value, the gradual abandonment of primary sectors in favour of a tertiary sector dominated by parasitic and unscrupulously profit-driven bureaucracy. Above all, the despotism of profit at all costs means that the menace of global destruction weighs down on human and terrestrial nature.
            To the extent that it obeyed, like its predecessors, an economic determination, the revolution of May ’68 demonstrates the necessary transformation of a commodity system that, in its crisis, discovered a new profitability in the reconstruction of the natural environment devastated by a, from then on, archaic capitalism, so dominant that it is still with us. It marked the gradual disappearance of political ideologies and the emergence of ideologies that were more directly focused on everyday life: hedonism, ethical consumerism, humanitarianism, and environmentalism.

10

On the other hand, the revolution of 1968 does have a specific characteristic: it was the first to carry the consciousness of the fact that, by limiting themselves to labouring for new forms of the economy, revolutionaries act in opposition to their human aspirations, which is to live better and not to dig themselves deeper into a system of survival that transforms their desires into commodity values. If the world has changed more in a few years than it has in many millennia, it is because in 1968 it began to change its foundation.

11

Because neo-capitalism must now impose itself against the barbarism of a capitalism whose agonising profitability entails the agony of the Earth, everything encourages it to establish itself through an ethic. But, the same is true for humanist ethics as for the liberty of thought and action that democratic institutions formally guarantee: it pretends to protect against lucrative inhumanity, pollution, corruption and the gangsterism of business, but it reduces to wilful abstraction a will to live that only enjoyment of the self and of the world is able to make the foundation of the creation of individual destiny and its environment.

12

If to be radical, as Marx wrote, is “to grasp the root of the matter. But, for man, the root is man himself”, the time has come for everyone to seize himself as the centre of a battle whose everyday outcome radically influences – in the direction of the living or resigned morbidity – the outcome of world events. It is this confrontation at the root to which everything that is undertaken in the name of the economy, of society, of morality and of humanity must refer.

13

Every use-value that is not a part of the project of enjoying the self and the world through the creation of the self and the world participates in the alienating commodity system.

14

It is no longer enough for intelligence to rely on the epoch in order to change it. From now on the body must become conscious of its will to live and of its environment as a territory to be liberated in order to establish the sovereignty of life.

[Vaneigem, Raoul. Postface: “Observations sur le Manifeste”. Manifeste du Parti Communiste par Karl Marx et Friedrich Engels. Paris: Mille et une nuits, 1994.]

Wednesday, October 9, 2013

Plagiariasm for all, not just boring poets - Anthony Hayes

Following a recent poetry scandal involving plagiarism in which the Situationist International was evoked, Anthony Hayes has written this excellent critique of the arguments put forward by the grandees of Australian poetry and an explanation of the real importance of the subject of plagiarism to the Situationists.

The real poverty of poetry (and poets) is a life lived beneath the rule of the economy. Poetry must be destroyed so that it can be realised in everyday life. The Spectacle is the garret room of experience!

Click here for the Link